1881 Marlin

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jknappent
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Re: 1881 Marlin

Post by jknappent » Tue Mar 01, 2016 4:36 pm

so if i have a 1881 marlin45/70 with a single trigger is it valued same as double trigger. the marlin was made in 1891.
thanks
joe

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Re: 1881 Marlin

Post by Regnier (gunrunner) » Tue Mar 01, 2016 5:07 pm

Joe;

Since the double set trigger is not a common feature found on Model 1881's, it will tend to give a little boost to the value over a gun that does not have set triggers. Frankly, other features that are far more rare will help the value more than set triggers. Half octagon barrels are extremely rare and even more rare are round barrel Model 1881's. The half magazine is rare and will add to the value somewhat. Pistol grip stocks are desirable, and if they are NOT checkered, even more desirable as the majority will have been checkered.
Due to the increasing cost of ammunition, there be no warning shot!

The growing federal deficit = generational slavery to the national debt.

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Re: 1881 Marlin

Post by jknappent » Tue Mar 01, 2016 6:58 pm

what is the value of a 1881 marlin deluxe,one trigger very good condition.made in 1891. checkered stock regular sites
thanks
joe

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Re: 1881 Marlin

Post by Joseph sturgell » Tue Jan 03, 2017 2:20 pm

I just received an1881 4570 marlin rifle from the estate.Must have more info on her.Ser#13XXX. She has twin sets,pistolgrip,Dk Burle wood ,W/checkerd stock,& a buck and doe carved in to sides of gun W/6 sided gun berrarl.Front sight looks like silver stub. would apprecheate any infomaition.
thank u virginia Rogers.

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Re: 1881 Marlin

Post by Regnier (gunrunner) » Tue Jan 03, 2017 2:29 pm

Virginia;

A Marlin Model 1881 with a serial number in the 13,000 range should have been made in 1886.
Of the nearly 22,000 Model 1881's produced, only 4,769 are listed in the records in the .45 government (.45-70) caliber.
Only 2,929 are listed in the records with double set triggers.
And, there are 1,303 listed in the records as having the pistol grip stock.
Standard barrel length for the Model 1881 was 28 inch octagon, but other barrel lengths were offered.
That is about all that can be determined at this time. I hope this helps.
Due to the increasing cost of ammunition, there be no warning shot!

The growing federal deficit = generational slavery to the national debt.

If the world was perfect.......it wouldn't be.

Joseph sturgell
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Re: 1881 Marlin

Post by Joseph sturgell » Sat Jan 14, 2017 4:00 pm

Thank u very much for the info,How do i find out about the carving??

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Re: 1881 Marlin

Post by Regnier (gunrunner) » Sat Jan 14, 2017 5:05 pm

Joseph;

There are several Model 1881's in the 13,000 serial number range that are factory engraved. Of course, to determine if it is indeed original from the factory, it would need to be seen to compare it to original factory engraved guns. Guns in this range have less coverage than the earlier engraved guns.
Majority of pistol grip stocks were checkered from the factory. It is the rare, and unusual gun that does not have checking on a pistol grip stock.
Due to the increasing cost of ammunition, there be no warning shot!

The growing federal deficit = generational slavery to the national debt.

If the world was perfect.......it wouldn't be.

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Re: 1881 Marlin

Post by OkieT » Mon Jan 07, 2019 5:20 am

I know of an 1881 Marlin in 40-60 with serial number 256. Marlin was contacted and offered some information, but also advised that many records were destroyed by fire.

Here is the response from Marlin.

Thank you for taking the time to take the photos. According to the information provided, you have a Marlin Model 1881. We have limited information on the Marlin Model 1881. Here is a brief history of the 1881.

John Marlin established his reputation as a gun manufacturer as early as 1870 with the production of pistols and Ballard rifles. His first production of repeating rifles did not appear until 1881 when he joined forces with and incorporated a number of patents with his to produce a top-eject repeating rifle.

Not identified as Model 1881 until the year 1888, the new Marlin repeater was a side-loading, top-ejection, lever action rifle of the bolt class. When first introduced it was available in either caliber .45 GOVT (.45-70) or .40 (.40-60). The octagon barrel was 28” and held 10 cartridges. It was priced at $32.00 (At the time, it was one of the most expensive lever action repeaters available.) There were many features and options that could be special ordered. A Browning-patented loading tool was introduced in 1883 and was available for other models also, these tools are highly desired to add a collection.

There are three different barrel markings found on the Model 1881. The first is one line and lists patents dates from 1865 to 1880. The second type of markings is two lines and includes the same patents dates as the first until 1881 when the company changed their name from J.M. Marlin to The Marlin Fire Arms Co. The third type is marking is Marlin Fire-Arm Co. The abbreviation for Connecticut is now CT rather than CONN of the second-type, and the word reissue is now hyphenated RE-ISSUE. Roll-stamps usually have decorative cartouche at both ends of the stamping. In addition to be a decoration, the fancy ends act as a lead-in buffer to the steel roller, taking the initial pressure of contact and causing the roll-stamp to rotate down the barrel. There may be other patents hand engraved, because the roll-stamp was not updated through the years. This should have been done to save money because hand-engraver dies were expensive.

Many of the pats of the Model 1881 are serial-numbered, along with the receiver. It is common to find bolts, barrels, buttstocks, buttplates, mortise covers, extractors, firing pins, forearms, and receivers marked with serial numbers.

When introduced, the Model 1881 was designed for the large .45 and .40 caliber cartridges which the relative size of the rifle was large. And had octagon barrels that were 28” and 30” long and would hold 10 cartridges. In due course, to make a lighter rifle, shorter 24” barrel were made available and receivers were lightened. The variations are:
• Heavy Receiver (first variation): Front bottom of receiver stepped (rebated). Top tang has square corner where it meets the receiver. Weight 9-11 lbs. Wide front and rear flanges to receiver.
• Heavy Receiver (second variation): No step in bottom of receiver and now has a radius at junction of top tangs and receiver. Weight 9-11 lbs. Wide front and rear flanges to receiver
• Light Receiver: Introduced in 1885, the .45-70 Light and .40-60 Light were listed as “…lighter models especially adapted to export trade….” This rifle weighed 8 ¼ - 8 ¾ lbs. The original model offered barrels 24” or 28” long. Front receiver flange wide, rear flange narrow.
• Small Receiver: Thinner and smaller; was only offered in .32-40 and .38-55. Weight 7 ¼ - 7 ½ lbs. Both front and rear flanges narrow.

The top tang of late 1881’s is drilled and tapped for tang sights. The spacing is 1 1/8” on centers. Many rifles are observed with three or more sight holes in the top tang. The factory only drilled two; any others were done after the gun left the Marlin plant.

The Model 1881 did not enjoy great popularity as others when introduced. Yet compared with it’s predecessors, it was well received and widely used for big game hunting. It was the first successful large-caliber lever action repeating rifle.

Serial number information is limited with the early models of Marlins. There are no records from 1906 to 1940; these records were destroyed in a fire. The serial number records do not carry any model, sales, features, design changes or individual gun information. We only have generic time period information with no details. Serial number could be duplicated in early year between numerous models; and they are not always in sequential order.

For more information you may want check out the following publication: “Marlin Firearms; A History of the Guns and the Company That Made Them” Author: LT. COL. William S. Brophy USAR RET. Published by: Stackpole Books; ISBN # 978-0-8117-0877-7. Or contact the Marlin Collectors Association at: http://www.marlin-collectors.com.

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marlinman93
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Re: 1881 Marlin

Post by marlinman93 » Mon Jan 07, 2019 10:54 am

There are no records for Marlin rifles with serial numbers under 4,000 @. And I continue to be puzzled by the new owner's reference to a "fire" destroying Marlin records. I don't know of any fire destroying Marlin records, and have never seen proof of a fire anywhere. One would think if there had been a fire at some point that Bill Brophy would have mentioned it in his book on Marlin history. Especially since he was the factory historian for such a long period of time.
Marlin lever actions 1870's-WWI, Ballards, and single shot rifles!

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Re: 1881 Marlin

Post by OkieT » Mon Jan 07, 2019 12:25 pm

Thank you for the reply and information on serial numbers below 4000. Note, the content of my original post came directly from Marlin while I trying to acquire information.
Thanks again

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Re: 1881 Marlin

Post by Regnier (gunrunner) » Mon Jan 07, 2019 1:27 pm

OkieT;

Something you should be aware of about serial number 256,is that it is known as what collectors call the early rebated receiver. From research by collectors of the Model 1881, it is now known that there were less than 300 made with the rebated receiver. Several books mention that the number was less than 600, but that number is now incorrect. The rebated receiver is quite rare and desired by collectors, especially if found in better than average condition. (meaning SOME original finish on the wood and metal)
If what you wrote in the previous post is correct, then Marlin is putting out some bad information. The second style barrel marking is still a J. M. Marlin roll stamp, but in two lines as opposed to the first marking that was a single line marking 7 1/2 inches long. It was the third style barrel marking that changed to Marlin Fire-Arms Company. The single line barrel marking is extremely rare as only about the first 40 or so guns were marked with the single line roll die.
Due to the increasing cost of ammunition, there be no warning shot!

The growing federal deficit = generational slavery to the national debt.

If the world was perfect.......it wouldn't be.

OkieT
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Re: 1881 Marlin

Post by OkieT » Mon Jan 07, 2019 1:52 pm

Awesome information. In response to you, yes my information came directly from Marlin after I opened a case with them in 2017. I do have pictures of the rifle, but don't know exactly how to post those. I read the FAQ and don't have pics posted on a public web site. I would say it has substantially more than SOME original finish on metal and wood. The full stamp is two lines, with the top being J.M. Marlin. New-Haven, Conn,U.S.A The next line contains all the patent information. If you could assist with posting pictures, I would be happy to share with you. I appreciate you sharing your knowledge with me, it has been very difficult to find accurate info or get anyone to appraise it.

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Re: 1881 Marlin

Post by Regnier (gunrunner) » Mon Jan 07, 2019 2:39 pm

OkieT;

Contact Road King about posting photos. He has in the past had people email the photos to him and he posted them for the individuals needing help. His email address is posted in some of the other posts here.
Good luck.....
Due to the increasing cost of ammunition, there be no warning shot!

The growing federal deficit = generational slavery to the national debt.

If the world was perfect.......it wouldn't be.

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Road King
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Re: 1881 Marlin

Post by Road King » Mon Jan 07, 2019 4:39 pm

Hi OkieT
If you send me your pictures to my e mail address I will post them for you.
Try to have clear photos of the gun
My e mail address is. bwatson0568@rogers.com

Regards
Brian
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Re: 1881 Marlin

Post by Road King » Wed Jan 09, 2019 7:07 pm

Here are the photos of OkieT's Model 1881. :wink:

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