Color case hardening

Anything to do with gun smithing.
Jim D
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Postby Jim D » Thu Dec 28, 2006 2:18 pm

Buck,

This is the reason that I'd like to duplicate the process as much as possible from details shown on the film. If I can get the crucible, packing method, dumping method, tank details, temperatures, etc worked out from the film, then I can nail down pretty much all of the variables other than the mix and the chemical makeup of the quench water. Example, hard water, soft water, iron content, etc. I may use distilled water, which is what I use when I normally CCH. So, that leaves the mix as the last controlling variable. I'll
start with straight wood/bone charcoal ratios and see how close I get.

-jim

backtobethel
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Postby backtobethel » Fri Dec 29, 2006 8:22 pm

So . . . once you get it figured out, will you be needing additional pieces to do test runs on? :wink:

Jim D
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Postby Jim D » Sat Dec 30, 2006 1:39 pm

Backtobethel:

I have a number of my own receivers that I will run the first tests on. After that, I don't know. I do CCH as a hobby, not as a business. Depending on how close I get, I may run a batch or two for members for purposes of testing consistancy. If I do, they will have to be pre 1899 since I don't have an FFL, they will have to be polished by someone other than me, and they would have to sign some sort of waiver. (I don't ever have problems with warping, but liability scares the *beep* out of me).

I'm doing this in order to try and further the knowledge and understanding of a long lost process, and to satisfy my own curiousity. I will only CCH someone else's gun if I can closely duplicate original Marlin colors. There's no sense in creating a bunch of 1893s that don't look original.

I'll post pictures on this site after the first run. It might take 1-2 months to get everything set up. I'll keep you posted.....

-jim

Jim D
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Postby Jim D » Thu Jan 25, 2007 7:56 pm

I have most of the equipment completed and will be giving this a try in a couple of weeks as soon as I have parts from 4 or 5 guns polished. The equipment matches Marlin's setup as closely as I could determine from the 1920's film. It weighs about 80 lbs when loaded with charcoal and parts. Here's a photo of a "brand W" 1886 that I recently recased and restored:


Image

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Four-Eyed Buck
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Postby Four-Eyed Buck » Fri Jan 26, 2007 10:16 am

That looks great, Jim............Buck 8) :wink:
If Marlin made SA revolvers, I'd be shooting those, too!!!

Jim D
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Postby Jim D » Fri Jan 26, 2007 11:27 am

Thanks Buck! My goal is to get the proper Marlin colors on Marlins using the same equipment and techniques that Marlin used. Everything that I've cased in the past has been done individually in a small crucible. I've had to use some shielding and other techniques to get the colors that you see. The Marlin process is quite different. I hope I don't get a hernia lifting the crucible from the oven to the quench tank!!!

-jim

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Four-Eyed Buck
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Postby Four-Eyed Buck » Fri Jan 26, 2007 3:41 pm

Time for a small electric crane? :lol: Maybe one on a rail overhead. can't wait to see how you do...................Buck 8) :wink:
If Marlin made SA revolvers, I'd be shooting those, too!!!

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marlinman93
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Postby marlinman93 » Fri Jan 26, 2007 5:58 pm

Very nice work on the 1886 Jim! The colors don't seem far off from what Marlin did, so I'd say you wont have to change much to get it spot on!
Marlin lever actions 1870's-WWI, Ballards, and single shot rifles!

Jim D
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Postby Jim D » Fri Jan 26, 2007 9:23 pm

Thanks Vall. The composition of the steel will make a difference if everything else is equal. In this case though the whole quench process will be different. I've color cased half a dozen or so Marlins in the past, using the same method that I use for the 1886's, but I haven't gotten what I consider to be accurate Marlin colors. That's why I'm anxious to try this out. Well, all except for the polishing.... :?

Jim D
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Postby Jim D » Sat Jan 27, 2007 4:03 pm

Here's what the setup looks like. The handle is used to lift the crucible out of the oven. The crucible sets on the base on the quench barrel. The lid is lifted off with the hook on the pully and then the crucible is rotated to dump the contents. The open crucible will exposed to air for only a couple of seconds before the contents are dumped.

Image

Jim D
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Postby Jim D » Sat Jan 27, 2007 4:06 pm

Image

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marlinman93
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Postby marlinman93 » Sat Jan 27, 2007 5:05 pm

Very ingenious Jim! Have you filled the box with anything and tried the dump test yet? Is it quick and smooth?
Marlin lever actions 1870's-WWI, Ballards, and single shot rifles!

Jim D
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Postby Jim D » Sat Jan 27, 2007 5:48 pm

Vall,

I haven't tried dumping anything yet, but the center of gravity makes it very easy and quick to turn over. In fact I may have to put a stop on it so it doesn't turn too far. I'm hoping that the centrifugal force will keep the parts and charcoal in the box until they drop in the tank. Marlin didn't use a base like this and simply rolled the handle and crucible to dump it. I thought this would give more consistant results. If I have problems, I'll ditch the base and do it the way Marlin did.

Image

Jim D
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Postby Jim D » Sat Jan 27, 2007 6:01 pm

Here's what the crucible looks like in the oven. The oven has a programable controller which I'd highly recommend to anyone serious about color case hardening.

Image

Sure-Shot
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Postby Sure-Shot » Sat Jan 27, 2007 6:39 pm

I hope you will have someone film your doing this so we can watch it one time. Great work and I will gladly donate some early 94 receivers if you need more. I have a couple for a project rifle but have not had time to get around to making it yet. No liability and no regrets if anything goes wrong.
GBOT, GBUSA


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